OCTA Innovation Issue 19/ 2017 – SAERI

OCTA Innovation Issue 19/ 2017 – SAERI

South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute (SAERI) based in Falkland Islands, is undertaking important scientific research in the South Atlantic and beyond. With annual turnover 1 million €, 8 PhD students it is a great scientific partner for visiting researchers and collaboration worldwide. Contact Tara Pelembe.

The South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute, is an academic organisation conducting research in the South Atlantic from the tropics down to the ice in Antarctica. SAERIs vision is to be an internationally recognised academic institute, based In the Falkland Islands, operating in the South Atlantic from the equator down to the ice in Antarctica, conducting world class natural and physical science research, teaching students, and building capacity within and between the UK South Atlantic Overseas Territories.

The scientific mission is to advance environmental understanding in the South Atlantic through research excellence and innovative science leadership, using unique expertise to share, communicate and apply skills and findings.

SAERI continues to grow and develop since its inception. The range of work has extended beyond the South Atlantic to implementing Territory to Territory partnerships in the Caribbean.


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South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute

South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute

The South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute (SAERI), is an academic organisation conducting research in the South Atlantic from the tropics down to the ice in Antarctica. SAERIs vision is to be an internationally recognised academic institute, based In the Falkland Islands, operating in the South Atlantic from the equator down to the ice in Antarctica, conducting world class natural and physical science research, teaching students, and building capacity within and between the UK South Atlantic Overseas Territories.

The scientific mission is to advance environmental understanding in the South Atlantic through research excellence and innovative science leadership, using unique expertise to share, communicate and apply skills and findings.

SAERI continues to grow and develop since its inception. The range of work has extended beyond the South Atlantic to implementing Territory to Territory partnerships in the Caribbean.

Short description

The South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute (SAERI) remit includes the natural and physical sciences. It aims to conduct world class research, teach students, and build capacity within and between the South Atlantic Overseas Territories. It is also an IMS-GIS Data Centre.

Experience in international cooperation and research

Experience in coordinating research opportunities in natural and physical sciences in the wider South Atlantic and South Georgia as well as working with other research institutes to offer placements to students. Recent projects include Inshore fisheries, seaweed biodiversity, South Georgia Future Sciences, Best III, the ‘Gap’ Project, Marine Spatial Planning, South Georgia Patagonian Toothfish.

Main networking interests / added value

Experience in bringing together international delegations on research in natural and physical sciences.

Contact person and email

Dr Paul Brickle, pbrickle@env.institute.ac.fk

More on SAERI website

Falklands news Science
Biodiversity and ecosystem services in OCTs (BEST 2.0)

Biodiversity and ecosystem services in OCTs (BEST 2.0)

The South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute (SAERI) is in charge of coordinating the BEST 2.0 project for the South Atlantic Overseas Territories (SAOTs) and covers the following areas: Ascension Island, St Helena, Tristan da Cunha and the Falkland Islands.

The BEST 2.0 Programme is a funding facility, supported by the European Commission as part of the EU Biodiversity for Life (B4Life) flagship. It aims to support the objectives of the BEST Initiative by facilitating the continuation of important environmental and conservation work. It does this by providing grant funding for small-scale and medium-scale field actions on the ground for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in the EU Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs).

The OCTs are found in five regions around the world:

– Pacific
– Caribbean
– South Atlantic
– Indian Ocean
– Polar and Sub-Polar

The most significant achievement for the South Atlantic hub has been the success of the Small and Medium Grants call.

Falklands news Science
OCT to OCT partnership building

OCT to OCT partnership building

This project is a great example of OCT to OCT partnership, here between the Falklands Islands Government Institute (SAERI) and the Government of Montserrat (GoM), to transfer knowledge and skills from the South Atlantic to the Caribbean. This skills and knowledge transfer focuses on information management and Marine Spatial Planning. The project is facilitated by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC).

The aim of the project is to enhance the GoM’s data collection systems in accordance with best practices for sustainable governance and management and to transfer knowledge and skills from the South Atlantic to the Caribbean.

The objectives of the project are to assist the government of Montserrat to:

1. Formulate a data infrastructure appropriate to the islands needs to support its Marine and Terrestrial spatial planning in the context of environmental management and socio-economic development;
2. Improve the legal framework for sustainable management and use of the ocean resources; and
3. Formulate a strategy to implement Marine Spatial Planning and produce a Marine Spatial Plan in the context of environmental management and socio-economic development.

Falklands Montserrat news Science
Marine Spatial Planning in the Falkland Islands

Marine Spatial Planning in the Falkland Islands

The Marine Spatial Planning project (MSP), currently in ‘Development Phase’, focuses on a number of key areas, including a case-study undertaking an assessment of current fisheries closures as potential sites for marine conservation around the Falklands. Through this case study, fisheries closure areas across the Falklands have been reviewed to see how they fulfil the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) criteria for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).

The findings of this case study will be consulted on with the Falkland Islands stakeholder community and the resultant report shared with FIG.

Another area of focus for the project will be legislation – specifically, a review of current legislation, identifying legislative gaps which need addressing in order to successfully implement a robust marine spatial plan. The findings of this review, alongside a proposal looking at options for developing a long-term MSP strategy, will be delivered to the Executive Council of the Falkland Islands Government.

Key to the success of this second phase will be effective stakeholder engagement, a core principle of the project from when it started over two years ago.

Falklands news Science
Dolphins of the kelp (DOKE)

Dolphins of the kelp (DOKE)

 

The Falklands near-shore waters host a unique community of Commerson’s and Peale’s dolphins that exhibit a sympatric co-occurrence and apparent year-round reliance on coastal kelp forests. Despite both species being recognised as of conservation concern under international, regional and national plans relatively little is known about their populations or biology and hence vulnerability to anthropogenic threats.

Whilst offshore surveys have been conducted by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (1998-2004), inshore studies have been limited to voluntary cetacean reporting (e.g. Falkland Conservation’s Cetaceans Watch project), cataloguing of historical strandings, and a small-scale pilot study conducted in 2014. This information has given the first insight into the distribution of both species as well as a rough estimate on their population densities.

Complementary research strings are being combined to provide a holistic understanding of population abundance, habitat use and population genetics, and suggest the scale at which management should be framed.

Falklands news Science
Best III – Biodiversity and ecosystem services of European overseas

Best III – Biodiversity and ecosystem services of European overseas

Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Territories of European Overseas is a voluntary scheme involving seven regional knowledge hubs across the world: Amazonia, Pacific, Indian Ocean, Macaronesia, Caribbean, South Atlantic and the Polar and Sub-Polar region.

It is being coordinated by staff involved in local projects, working for and with local stakeholders, focusing on the EU Outermost Regions (ORs) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) biodiversity hotspots.

It aims to create:

– An open partnership bringing together a solid and experienced presence in the field
– Professional leading and supporting staff that will liaise with the European Commission, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Secretariat and donors that will be advised by high level scientific and funding experts.

The highlight is the publication of the South Atlantic Ecosystem Profile.

Falklands news Science
Inshore fisheries research project

Inshore fisheries research project

The project investigated a number of shallow marine species in the waters of the Falkland Islands to gain an understanding of their distribution, life history, ecology and fisheries biology, with particular attention on the red sea urchin, the keyhole limpet, striped clam, giant barnacles, ribbed mussels and giant mussels as these are high-value on local, regional and global markets.

This investigation into their ecology and biology was funded by the Falkland Islands Government with a view to providing an evidence-base to feed into decision-making around potential commercial harvesting of inshore species in the Falkland Islands. This is the first time that research of this nature has been conducted into these species around the Falkland Islands in this area of their ranges.

Falklands news Science
Declaration

Declaration

The OCTA Innovation International Conference took place in Ponta Delgada, Azores on 11-14 April 2017. It gathered representatives of the Overseas Countries and Territories of the European Union (OCTs), the government of the Azores, the European Commission and innovation experts to look at how innovation is spurring sustainable development in small islands and to develop cooperation and future initiatives.

The pillars and values that are the basis of a society were considered as well as the capacities and needs of all stakeholders to underpin them. The implementation of different types and different levels of innovation have been under consideration. The vision of an economically prosperous and inclusive society should be based on innovation and entire collaboration between public and private actors. Innovation should support all stakeholders in society, in both economic and social fields and is perceived as crucial for tackling the issues of natural resources, climate change and sustainable development. The governments have to ensure enabling conditions for propelling innovation. Innovation Managers of the Overseas Countries and Territories of European Union, active members of OCTA Innovation, assembled in the Azores, commit themselves to feeding these dynamics.

Governments must take the lead in systemic innovation across all sectors; fostering partnerships between public and private entities and knowledge sharing and capacity-building. The ambition is to grow a number of thematic and regional centres of excellence among OCTs with a focus on those sectors where individual OCTs are already leading the way, and to share expertise among the OCTs and with regions.

Innovation Managers: Anguilla, Bren Romney; Aruba, Bianca Peters; Bonaire, Dianne Boelmans; British Virgin Islands, Lizette George; Cayman Islands, Jamaal Anderson; Curaçao, Fiona Curie; Falkland Islands, Michael Betts; French Polynesia, Bran Quinquis; Greenland, Lars Balslev; Montserrat, Angela Estwick; New Caledonia, Jean-Michel Le Saux; Pitcairn, Leslie Jaques; Saba, Menno Van der Velde; St. Barthélemy, Pascal Peuchot; St. Helena, Niall O’Keeffe; St. Pierre-et-Miquelon, Olivier Gaston; St. Eustatius, Roy Hooker; St. Maarten, Jude Houston; Turks and Caicos Islands, Alexa Cooper-Grant; Wallis and Futuna, Carole Manry.

OCTA Innovation Team Leader, Milan Jezic von Gesseneck: innovation@octa-innovation.eu

Greenland Falklands New Caledonia Sint Eustatius sustainable development Montserrat Curaçao British Virgin Islands Aruba event French Polynesia news OCTA Sint Maarten Turks and Caicos Islands St Barts Saba Cayman Islands Bonaire Anguilla Saint Helena Tristan da Cunha islands Saint Pierre and Miquelon Wallis And futuna Pitcairn Bianca Peters Menno Van Der Velde Jamaal Anderson Fiona Curie Lizette O. George Roy Hooker Carole Manry Dianne Boelmans Olivier Gaston Alexa-Cooper-Grant Michael Betts Bran Quinquis Niall O'Keeffe Pascal Peuchot Jezic von Gesseneck Conferences Azores